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growing concern about the bombing of rebel-held areas by gaddafi's forces, there are voices in the u.s. and europe calling for the rebels to be armed to directly. it sounds simple, but history offers plenty of cautionary tales. in a moment, we will hear whether senator john mccain thinks it is a good idea. >> what i am calling for is a greater access for the libyan opposition forces for weaponry. >> there is no guarantee that by helping these people, you necessarily bring about a more democratic outcome or more desirable outcome. >> the question is, what kind of arms with a supply? whom would supply them? britain session -- britain's special forces may have suffered a setback last week in libya. but the momentum is still building in the west for military intervention of some kind, including perhaps arm the rebels. in libya, repeated bombing by government warplanes around the rebel-held oil town of ras lanuf marks colonel gaddafi's drive in his country. opposition forces are determined, but still lack a clear organization or command structure. the worst violence was reported near tripol
. this is overnight videotape from the u.s. navy, a u.s. coalition launching two nights of punishing air attacks targeting mommar gadhafi's forces, b52 bombers, jet fighters, more than 120 tom hawk cruise missiles, scattering progovernment forces on the ground in libya, the long time leader vowing a long war ahead. good morning, everybody. we've got it all covered for you. what a way to start a weefnlgt i'm bill hemmer, welcome to "america's newsroom". good morning to you martha. martha: good morning, bill. i am martha maccallum. an international air assault, all but crippling libya's air defenses, that according to the u.s. military. listen to this: >> there has been no new air activity by the regime and we have de tented no radar emissions from the defense sites targeted and there has been a significant decrease in the use of all libyan air surveillance radar which is most of those appear to be limited now only to the areas around tripoli and surt. we are not ruling out strikes against valid targets when and if the need arises. martha: there you have it, u.s., british and french planes blastin
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
is set to have broadband speeds 200 times faster than the u.s. average. go to our website for more questions and answers. thanks to all of you for being part of my program this week. and i will see you next week. >>> your child gets into college. now the hard part -- how do you pay for it? we'll help you track down the money this hour. >>> and in these tough times, you might need to update your resumÉ. we've got some do's and don't's in the 4:00 p.m. eastern hour. >>> and 5:00, thousands of women take on walmart in a sex discrimination suit. it could be the most important case the u.s. supreme court hears this term. you're in the cnn news room, i'm fredricka witfield. >>> on the international front, rebel forces in libya say they are controlling two more key towns in their advance to tripoli. this is smoke hanging over the city of ras laneuf that where an opposition spokesman tells cnn government troops have pulled out of ports. both places were claimed by pro gadhafi forces at the start of the civil war. the next major city is moammar gadhafi's home town. rebel forces anticipate
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
. president obama says gadhafi must go. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> now the tough questions. what's the end game? who is really in charge? what do we know about the rebels and what happens if gadhafi won't go? also tonight, another arab regime on the ropes. is yemen the next to fall? and in japan, new fears over radiation and the food supply. is the already desperate population at greater risk? this is a special live edition of "piers morgan tonight" from london. good evening. breaking news from libya and shocking video uploaded to youtube today. cnn cannot independently confirm details of when or where it was shot but it shows civilians on a street being bombed. watch the scene. extraordinary footage of civilians being bombed in misurata. some were heard shouting before the explosion hit. we don't know what happened to the people closest to the explosion or who caused it. we have dramatic new video taken in tripoli showing tracer fire over the city. there have been a series of bombardments from allied forces towards colonel gadhafi's forces. nic robertson is live
of a new partnership to fight distracted driving. a partnership between "consumer reports" and the u.s. department of transportation. the transportation secretary ray la hood says distracted driving killed nearly 5500 people in 2009. joran van der sloot, the key suspect in the 2005 disappearance of the american teenager natalee holloway will plead guilty to the killing of another woman last year in peru, so says his lawyer. and says the 23-year-old will argue temporary temporary insanity to try to shorten his sentence. van der sloot met with the woman while gambling last may. joran van der sloot's lawyer says he plans to argue that his client killed 21-year-old stefanie florist because she had learned of his relation to the holloway case while using his lap top. van der sloot is not formally charged in that case. a 20-year-old police chief who had accepted the job as police chief of a violent mexican border town is now without a job. garcia fired today for abandoning her post. according to a statement from the city there, the police chief had been granted permission to travel to the un
shortage here in the u.s. as well as, is it going to have a lasting economic harm to various vectors of the economy. those would be the main two reasons. >> and what, when you factor in right now we're in the spring season, close to spring, where people will perhaps take holiday breaks for spring break with their children and then soon summer will be upon us, and eknow the rule at summer, gas prices go up with the change of the weather. >> well, the gas prices go up from the winter to the summer because we have to change the formulation. >> the blend. >> and it's more expensive in the summertime. the good news is, is that gasoline stocks are adequate, and if we look at the whole world supply and demand, crude oil demand goes down during the second quarter. so there will be a little bit of a respite from the tenseness of the overall supply/demand situation. >> i'm the type of person, i've tried to look at best-case scenario but in this case you want to look at worst-case scenario. is it possible we will see gas prices beyond an average of $4 a gallon on average in this country by the
is the u.s. on the sidelines? >> don't tell me we can't do a no-fly zone over tripoli. >> sean: john edwards may be indicted soon. we are on the road to 2012, hannity starts right here, right now. tonight president obama's views on the tea party in america has been exposed.ç stunning excerpts from a new book reveal the president's belief that racism was in fact a deep seated motivation of the movement. the absurd assessment can be found in family of freedom, presidents and african-americans in the white house. according to the book at a private white house dinner in may of 2010 the president explained that race was wobbly a key component in the rising opposition to his presidency from conservatives, especially right wing activists in the tea party movement. rather than dispute that notion, president obama agreed and reportedly called racism the subterranean agenda of the movement. without a shred of evidence the president has no problem labeling the tea party as racist. in recent years he's been quick to if forgive racially insensitive remarks made by some on the left. remember whe
>> today on "christian world news" war over libya. once again the u.s. takes military action in a muslim nation. what does it mean for the church in the middle east? >> plus -->> we got everything we need. we are so fortunate. what can we do to help? >> truckload of compassion, a ministry distributing to japan. >> from the uk, the christian counselor that could lose his job for telling a gay man homosexuals can change. >> revolutions and military strikes in the middle east raise concerns for the region's christian. hello everyone i am wendy griffith. >> and i am george clooney. george thomas. the united states put together the coalition enforcing a no-fly zone over the nation of libya. state goal, to protect libyan citizens by a massacre by moammar gadhafi's forces. the conflict is raising forces about western interventions in muslim nations. specifically, charges of a christian crusade against the islamic face. cliffton clark is an associate professor of global missions at regent university. recently i spoke with him about this very issue. >> do muslim nations see the u.s. t
the individual investor. the u.s. attorney leading this charge, according to lawyers that we talk to that know him, they say he's just getting started. >> i see what he's done as nothing short of throwing a neutron bomb on to wall street. you know neutron bombs leave institutions intact but get rid of people. this man can't be corrupted. he's not looking for a political advantage. he's not looking to become a judge. he's not looking to become mayor of new york city. he's not looking for the next stop. >> reporter: a neutron bomb onto wall street. quite an image. some people think it need cleaning up. brooke, this is a criminal case, traditionally hard to win especially when talking about insider trading. the bar is very high, the prosecution will have to convince the jury that raj rajaratnam is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. they have their work cut out for them. >> as the bar is so high, part of the issue here in this kind of case you have the high-tech surveillance equipment, critical here. is it different, is it new for this kind of case, insider trading? >> reporter: well, it is a littl
, both before and after the u.s.-led invasion of 2001. and from 1991 to 1993 he was the foreign minister of algeria. he is currently a distinguished fellow at the london school of economics. he is one of the elders, a group of eminent global leaders brought together by nelson mandela to try to solve the world's problems-- or at least offer some advice. i am pleased to have him back on this program. welcome back. >> thank you very much. it's good to be here. >> rose: so let's just start with the obvious. what kind of advice should you be offering and the group of elders about change in the middle east? >> you know, this change is definitely taking place. it is the work of the people of the region of the different countries. there is a lesson of humility there. nobody has predicted how and when it was going to happen. >> rose: or that it was. >> that it was going to happen. nor the order in which it's happening. so i think we... if we learn that lesson of humility, that's already a great contribution. the second thing is, you know, in places like tunisia and egypt they have been facing the
rebels. a spokesman says the u.s. won't send weapons to a post office box in eastern libya. momentum for a no-fly zone is building today at the united nations. nato has begun 24-hour surveillance over libya. >> civil rights groups are angry over president obama's guantanamo bay flip-flop. he is ordering military tribunals to resume for three dozen gitmo detainees. another 47 will be held indefinitely without trial. critics say legal safeguards for detainees are window dressing on the bush administration policy. >>> spanish authorities plan an autopsy on the body of an american student in madrid. friends last saw austin bice ten days ago when he left a night club alone. bice's body was found in a river not far from the night club. detectives say there are no obvious signs of foul play. >>> joran van der sloot's lawyer says he's going to argue temporary insanity in the death of 21-year-old peruvian woman last year. the goal is a reduced charge and lighter sentence. van der sloot is also the prime suspect in the disappearance of american teenager natalee holloway in aruba. >>> a u.s. im
europe needs to stop being naive ought play needs to --. how big is that for the u.s.. >> following the list there's a strong sense. i give a lot of credit to our european partners. we don't have any illusions about where the european publics are and the skepticism they have about this. but it is a way forward to the political and military strategy and this is a price our partners have played a role in slovenia and bosnia offering troops for afghanistan. this is the kind of thing we look for and we see the countries in the western balkans showing the will and determination and understanding, to share the burden of responsibility. >> they thought there was a problem, they made a harsh siege. what in your view to contribute more to the military situation whenever there is one rather than -- jobs in the united states and think it can do judgment in development work? >> i don't think europe thinks that. a friend of mine and somebody i'd meet every month to talk about nato collaboration. he has a job worry about defense commitments. and looking at issues of finance and the european union
-- the u.s. should not do this unilaterally. but at the nato summit meeting with defense ministers thursday, he needs to come out of that meeting, nato needs to come out with a plan of action that sends a clear message to gadhafi and the people around him, your days are up, the game is over. >> david, will cain here. i want to ask a question, we could be waiting on an international coalition or approval to sanction action. i've been asking this question over and over -- why would we intervene in libya, i still haven't received an answer that totally satisfies me. the most consistent one is that it would be the right thing to do because people are dying. for altruistic reasons. here's my question -- if we're looking to do the right thing, why do we need international approval to do the right thing? >> i think it's extraordinarily important especially with the president who is committed to the principles of international cooperation, collaboration, working through the u.n. i think it's extremely important that this president stick to his principles. i do think he's going to have a hard time g
't make the mistake that the u.s. made in iraq. he didn't dismantle the military completely. >> rose: he dismantled the leadership. >> and brought in a new cadre of officers. and then he did something else. gradually he built a parallel military called the islamic revoluonary guard corps, the i.r.g.c. and with every passing year he strengthened them to the dret remit of the military. so we now have two military, one that is significant. >> so tell me your picture of iran today. i mean khamenei is the supreme leader. >> khamenei is the supreme leader. i think his space of power is essentially the i.r.g.c., the revolutionary guards. >> rose: and they're more loyal to him than they are to ahmadinejad or anyone else? >> they are more loyal to themselves, i think, right now because... >> rose: they're the power center. >> they're the power center. they've become an economic juggernaut. >> rose: they own things. >> they own about half the country. literally about half of the economy. >> rose: so therefore, it is argued, that sanctions can have an impact because sanctions can deny them their so
. it will air one hour later in usual due to the time difference between the u.s. and britain. you can see it 8:00 eastern live on c-span 2. next, rode to the white house. then a discussion on what is ahead for congress and the president. and then the former new hampshire senator and governor. monday night, a white house summit on bling featuring a report from president obama and -- who speaks on his own experiences. >> we remember what it is like to see kids picked on. i have to say with my baby years and the name that i have, i was not immune. but because it is something that happens a lot, it is something that has been around, sometimes we turn a blind eye to the problem. >> watch it monday night on 10:00 eastern on c-span 3. today on a road to the white house, c-span interviewed radio talk-show host herman cain on why he is likely to enter the gop race. this is about 45 minutes. about 45 minutes. >> why are you thinking about running for president? >> i am thinking about running for president for several reasons. reasons. my parents were able to achieve their dreams. they wanted to own a ho
security committee he has no choice but to investigate the signs of islamic radicalization in the u.s. >> this is not an attack on muslims but the fact is the enemy right now is within the muslim community. the small percentage, but it's there. >> king also says moderate muslims are not doing enough to help the u.s. protect itself against threats. nbc's luke russert is here with more. luke? >> reporter: well, martin, this hearing will take place on thursday up on capitol hill, before the homeland security committ committee. it's got a lot of press. yesterday, in times square, 1,000 muslim-americans rallied against it with high-profile celebrity endorsements saying it's a political witch hunt. king is saying, look, you've seen a huge rise in the incidents of american radicalizations against muslims. he feels there's a threat from muslims from within the country of possibly being influenced by outside radical jihadists elements that have local mosque reputation here. on thursday, some of the witnesses he's going to bring forward are family members of folks who have been radicalized, kin
is now in place for the entire u.s. west coast. that means coastal communities in washington, oregon, california and southern alaska should be on alert and prepared for possible evacuation. a warning is also in place for hawaii, which was struck by a smaller 4.5 earthquake earlier today. now, there are no immediate reports of injuries or damage in hawaii but the state is bracing for the first waves from the tsunami which are expected to hit at 8:00 a.m. eastern time this morning. now, ahead of that, tsunami sirens were sounded and coastal areas are being evacuated. fires triggered by the earthquake were burning out of control up and down japan's coast, including one at an i'll refinery. according to the country's prime minister there was, quote, major damage in northeastern japan. but nuclear power facilities in the area were not damaged and there was no radiation leakage, they say. this is video from when the earthquake hit now. it struck at 2:46 p.m. local time and was followed by at least 19 powerful aftershocks. most of them measuring over 6.0. the size of the earthquake that str
as well, sean. u.s. -- uss george washington aircraft carrier, second ship destroyer left earlier than expected from a port south of tokyo. the word according to the u.s. navy they are trying to improve the red -- readiness of the . 9 back story with fox news is coming up with -- the back story with fox news is coming up with concerns about radiation is wanting the u.s. military to put their ships a little out to sea. as we know, humanitarian challenge following the quake and tsunami continues. monday new figures, the death toll is higher than we've been reporting, around 18,000. price tag for all this? 235 billion dollars. breaking news again from that troubled nuclear complex. >> sean: sad in many respects. joining me with more on the major international crisis facing the president in japan and libya, nationally syndicated fox news contributor, monica crowley. republican strategist, he lease jordan are with us. -- elise jordan are with us. the thing that stands out is how passive and disengaged this president is. >> i agree. when the japan crisis happened he did a lot of key battle g
watching hannity last night, it was revealed late in the day yesterday that unbeknownst to most u.s. senators apparently harry reid, nancy pelosi and obama hid $105 billion worth of appropriations inside that gigantic health care bill and nancy pelosi said we'll have to pass the thing to find out what's in it. we're finding out what's in it and it has prefunded itself for the next eight years. often times they pass bills and fund it later. it's not very often they do it this way. here she is. >> the bad news is obamacare is prefunded for the next eight years. the implementation. we thought if we can't repeal it, at least -- >> you can defund it. >> at least we can defund it. >> you cannot defund it. >> no, it's done. it's done! >> there's no way to remedy this? >> yes, there is. that's the good news. the good news is we've got this two-week continuing resolution. government runs out of money on march 18th. this is what we propose. we've written language to add on to the next continuing resolution that says obama, pelosi, reid, you give this money back. you didn't tell the americ
that there is something more beyond the boundaries of the u.s.a., and it was a big world with a lot of people living out their who are affected by your decisions. >> host: gives a a more global perspective. >> guest: i think so. >> host: we're talking about your book, "the obamas: the untold story of an african family." we've been looking at president obama's lineage to his father side in africa come in kenya. that's the one thing to rest. you're not a birther. we are not discussing whether obama was born in hawaii or born in india. you think he was born quite clearly in hawaii. now, because there are people who claim that our birth certificates, all kinds of circulate on the internet. this is a kind of issue that doesn't seem to go away. so let's try to put to rest a bit. why do you say, why are you confident that obama was born in hawaii? >> guest: there's never been an issue in britain. basically let anybody become prime minister, it's not a big deal. you have to be nativeborn. but i understand the constitution you have to be born on american territory to become president. so that's why it's a big t
that the majority of the u.s. segment was brought up a piece by piece. it will be truly amazing. >> congratulations on a successful mission. the question will be for someone who wants to tackle it. i do not think people on the ground can appreciate what the living spaces are like in the space station. now that it is complete can you talk a little bit about how large it is and how much space you had to move around in? >> just to start off, this space station is the largest pressurized volume in place in history -- in space in the history. i use the word that my son uses, which isginormous -- is g inormous. it is equivalent to a seventh 47 or bigger. it is oppressive -- a 747 or better. we can use every single one of the walls or models in a way that we cannot do on the ground. it makes for a wonderful resource for science and living and being up here floating around. it is great. >> i have a question about garbage, literally. how much trash does the iss generate? where do you put it and do you recycle? >> we do recycle certain things. we recycle our water and -- our urine and turned it into water. t
that there is something more beyond the boundaries of the u.s.a. and there is a big world with a lot of people living who are affected by decisions. >> host: it gives them a more global tears. we are talking about your book, "the obamas: the untold story of an african family." we have been looking at president obama's lineage through his father's side in africa and kenya. what's the one thing to rest. he ran not a further. we are not discussing whether obama was born in hawaii or kenya. you think he was born quite clearly in hawaii. now there are people with her certificate of all kinds circulating on the internet. this is an issue that doesn't seem to go away. so, let's put it to rest a little bit. why are you confident that obama was born in hawaii? >> guest: is not even an issue in britain. it's not a big deal. i understand constitutionally you have to be born an american territory to become president, so that's why it's a big thing. so i thought well, that's really have a close look and examine what the argument is. now, the first thing is he wasn't born in hawaii. and yet, the department of health h
of american women who were -- who were wives working in the u.s. embassy in nairobi at the time. and for all his faults obama, sr., was a very charming man and he could charm the ladies. he clearly impressed he's women not only with his ambition and his determination but intelligence. and so it's actually through private meetings he's actually able to secure a place in hawaii and he actually flew quite independently of oboya's airlift with american women from the american embassy who actually funded his place and his air fare. you talk about the selma speech and, you know, president obama is a consummate politician and he gave this great speech, rousing speech in selma in which he referred his father came over from this great airlift in which he used it to somehow claim part of the camelot connection. and kennedy wasn't elected until the following year. he made an error. and he acknowledged the error immediately. his campaign team actually made public just a few days after selma that actually that was an error and, in fact, it wasn't correct. so he did correct himself even though he was, i g
on possible military operations. gadhafi is promising to fight any no-fly zone, which he says proves the u.s. and other western nations are out to steal libya's oil. miguel marquez is on the scene in tripoli. miguel? >> reporter: good morning, george. moammar gadhafi is more confident this morning as the rebel advance in the east has been stopped in its tracks by his superior fire power. rebel forces have fallen back to the port city of ras lanuf and are digging in. now simply trying to hold their ground. a stunning turn of events. just days ago, rebel forces raced hundreds of miles towards tripoli. the momentum, with them. >> today, we can get ras lanuf. tomorrow, we will kill you everywhere in libya. >> reporter: anti-government protests broke in the capital and nearby towns. it looked like the end to one of the world's most bizarre authoritarian rulers. but dissent in and around tripoli is being violently crushed with everything such as riot police to tanks. in the capital where reporters cannot go, one said by phone, the fire is so heavy, the destruction so complete, it's like the town i
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)

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